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Glitch photography seems like a fitting new art offshoot that reflects our modern-day world, which —despite being cutting edge technologically — still suffers from lots of messed up pieces. Sabato Visconti raised money for a gallery showing of his glitch art on Kickstarter, and this avant-garde aesthetic seems to be gaining some steam. As Visconti tells re:form in an interview, “You could say it’s like torturing an image.”
Via re:form. Collage made with Pixlr Express. Do you make tortured art out of photos? (Tag them #pixlr and we’ll find ‘em.)
Glitch photography seems like a fitting new art offshoot that reflects our modern-day world, which —despite being cutting edge technologically — still suffers from lots of messed up pieces. Sabato Visconti raised money for a gallery showing of his glitch art on Kickstarter, and this avant-garde aesthetic seems to be gaining some steam. As Visconti tells re:form in an interview, “You could say it’s like torturing an image.”
Via re:form. Collage made with Pixlr Express. Do you make tortured art out of photos? (Tag them #pixlr and we’ll find ‘em.)

Glitch photography seems like a fitting new art offshoot that reflects our modern-day world, which —despite being cutting edge technologically — still suffers from lots of messed up pieces. Sabato Visconti raised money for a gallery showing of his glitch art on Kickstarter, and this avant-garde aesthetic seems to be gaining some steam. As Visconti tells re:form in an interview, “You could say it’s like torturing an image.”

Via re:form. Collage made with Pixlr Express. Do you make tortured art out of photos? (Tag them #pixlr and we’ll find ‘em.)

We’ve seen a number of people in the last year who take a very particular approach to post-processing their photos. They take many, many photos of a particular scene — sometimes literally hundreds — and blend them together to get specific kinds of textures. Matt Molloy does something like that, although he uses time-lapse photos to create what he calls “Time Stacks.” It’s quite amazing what he creates and inspires us to think about new techniques. 
Via My Modern Met. Collage made with Pixlr Express. Check out more of his work on his 500px page. 
We’ve seen a number of people in the last year who take a very particular approach to post-processing their photos. They take many, many photos of a particular scene — sometimes literally hundreds — and blend them together to get specific kinds of textures. Matt Molloy does something like that, although he uses time-lapse photos to create what he calls “Time Stacks.” It’s quite amazing what he creates and inspires us to think about new techniques. 
Via My Modern Met. Collage made with Pixlr Express. Check out more of his work on his 500px page. 

We’ve seen a number of people in the last year who take a very particular approach to post-processing their photos. They take many, many photos of a particular scene — sometimes literally hundreds — and blend them together to get specific kinds of textures. Matt Molloy does something like that, although he uses time-lapse photos to create what he calls “Time Stacks.” It’s quite amazing what he creates and inspires us to think about new techniques. 

Via My Modern Met. Collage made with Pixlr Express. Check out more of his work on his 500px page

Herman Damar, a self-taught Indonesian photographer, takes photos of villagers near Jakarta that are quite good. They’re kind of Lord of the Fly — but without all the cutthroat competition. It looks like an idyllic and unique life, and he does a superb job of imbuing it with mischievous fun. 
Via Bored Panda. Collage made with Pixlr Express. Lots more on his 500px page. 
Herman Damar, a self-taught Indonesian photographer, takes photos of villagers near Jakarta that are quite good. They’re kind of Lord of the Fly — but without all the cutthroat competition. It looks like an idyllic and unique life, and he does a superb job of imbuing it with mischievous fun. 
Via Bored Panda. Collage made with Pixlr Express. Lots more on his 500px page. 

Herman Damar, a self-taught Indonesian photographer, takes photos of villagers near Jakarta that are quite good. They’re kind of Lord of the Fly — but without all the cutthroat competition. It looks like an idyllic and unique life, and he does a superb job of imbuing it with mischievous fun. 

Via Bored Panda. Collage made with Pixlr Express. Lots more on his 500px page

Video Tutorial with Cindy Patrick Shows You How to Turn Photos into Fine Art

There’s a sweet spot between art and photography that we often seek out. We love to see people take their phones and tablets and create art out of photographs that might otherwise seem ho-hum or normal. That’s the promise of editing, and some people are quite good at it. In fact, some people can turn casually snapped photos into art that’s worthy of hanging on a wall.

Some people call this iPhoneographic art, but whatever you call it you will probably agree that making beautiful art from a phone you carry in your pocket is completely awesome and shows how great it is to live in this day and age. But can you, yourself, do it? Heck yeah you can. We’re going to show you how to make things like this: 

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We asked Cindy Patrick, a Philadelphia-based photographer who makes quite stunning art with apps like ours to show us how she does it. She uses lots of different apps but has developed a pretty streamlined process for creating what look like canvas paintings of seaside tableaux. We wanted to capture her process, and we thought the best way to do that would be to simply have her record her workflow so we can break down the process into easy-to-follow steps that Pixlr users can perform to make their own wall-worthy art. 

We put together a video for you to watch, and we’ve included the steps here in this post so you can follow along. This is an excellent way to create a portrait of a loved one or a landscape that deserves to be immortalized as a painting — but without having to learn how to draw and paint from scratch.

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Cindy’s goal with many of her images is to make the original photographic image look more like a painting. She also loves color, so she usually find ways to enhance or alter the existing color of the captured image. Here is her process for this image of a surfer:

Step 1: Basic Editing

She firsts opens her image in Iris Photo Suite and applies the “DynaRange” filter, which brightens the highlights and shadows, and “lifts” the image overall. This is very often the first step in her processing workflow. If you don’t have that app, some basic photo editing in Pixlr Express will get you there. The goal is to balance your lights and darks, and even something as simple as using auto-fix will probably get you there. After applying the filter, she saves the image to her camera roll.

Step 2: Stylize

Next, Cindy opens the image created in Step 1 in Pixlr Express. First, she crops the borders. She generally doesn’t like borders on her images, and she tends to crop them as a rule. But for this image, she knows she wants to add a stylized border later, so she eliminates it at this stage. She saves this cropped version of the image to her camera roll.

While still in Pixlr Express, she applies the “Dapple” filter (Stylize > Dapple). This gives her a nice painterly version of her photo. She saves this version to her camera roll and exits Pixlr.

Step 3: Blending

Next, she opens the Superimpose app and opens the cropped “DynaRange” version of the image (from Step 2) which automatically becomes her background image. She then opens the “Dapple” version as the foreground image (from Step 3) and blends the two images together using the “Darken” blend mode. This gives her a painterly version of the image but with a little bit of the realism brought back in. She backs off on the opacity a bit, and then saves that version to her camera roll.

If you don’t have Superimpose, you can experiment with the add-an-image feature in Pixlr Express and perform a similar task. Or, if you’re happy with how stylized your image is and don’t want to dial it back with realism, you can simply skip this step. It’s up to you to decide how realistic/painterly you want your image to become.

Step 4: Blur

Next, she opens the new version of the image (from Step 4) in the Blur FX app. She sets the blur mode to median blur and turns on the mask feature so she can see her image beneath. She proceeds to erase the blur from the figure of the surfer. After erasing the blur, she continues to refine the edges and clean up the selection. Before saving, she backs off on the blur a bit by moving the slider to the left and bringing some of the original image back in. She saves this image to her camera roll.

If you don’t have Blur FX, try the blur option in Pixlr Express and then erase the parts you don’t want to be blurry using the History Brush. The History Brush is probably one of the most overlooked but most useful tools in Pixlr Express. You can use it to layer on intense effects and then “paint out” the details in your image (like the surfer figure in Cindy’s image).

Step 5: Color, Texture

Next, she opens this new blurred version of the image in Pixlr Express. She knows she wants to adjust the color a bit, so she adds a filter by selecting “Effect” and then “Vintage and “Borg.” This gives her an overall turquoise color that she loves.

Next, she applies a texture by selecting “Overlay,” “Canvas,” and “Sand.” She then selects the History Brush (adjustment > history) and erases the sand texture from the figure of the surfer. Sand is a superb choice of overlay based on her painting, but you might simply want to choose the Canvas overlay if you’re goal is to make it look like a canvas painting. You can control the opacity and dial back the effect if you’re looking for something more subtle. Experiment!

Step 6: Finishing Touches

Next, she selects Borders > Default > Grunge and applies the border of choice to her image. She saves and exits the Pixlr app.

Finally, Cindy like to add some drips and drops of paint, which she does in an app called Repix. 

That’s it. That’s Cindy’s entire process for making art. You can skip some of these steps or do them all exactly like she does, but whatever you do keep experimenting. 

Do you make art like this? Please let us know. We’re on the lookout for art like this, and you can reach us on Twitter: @pixlr

Root for Your World Cup Team with “Beautiful Game” Flag Overlays in Pixlr Express

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The World Cup is upon us! To celebrate, we’ve created some flag overlays and stickers in Pixlr Express to help you root for your team. You’ll find 32 flag overlays representing each of the teams competing in the World Cup. Each flag is designed as an overlay to put on top of your photos in a subtle way, and we’ll keep this special “Beautiful Game” effects pack around in Pixlr Express for the web, iOS, and Android for the duration of the World Cup. With these, you can make very neat images like this: 

Even if you’re not a soccer/football fan, we encourage you to try them out. They look pretty sweet. A few tips for these overlays:

  • As with other overlays in Pixlr Express, you can dial down the opacity or rotate them to add a little more control. 
  • Some work better with darker images, some work better with lighter images. 
  • Want a really strong flag effect? Try knocking out the color completely from your image before adding these overlays (e.g., an antique filter). Then, after adding your flag effect turn up the saturation massively. 
  • You can mimic a slight double exposure effect by lowering the contrast of your image before adding your flag overlay.

They’re definitely worth experimenting with. We made a few for this post to show you what they look like, but you can go make one right now in the web version of Pixlr Express. Go for it!

In fact, if you make something and share it out there in the social sphere, tag it #beautifulgame. We’ll be watching the social networks to see what people create. We’ll be tweeting, favoriting, and anointing Pic of the Day status to some the best photos that use these overlays. 

Who do you think is going to win? We’re sort of leaning toward Italy: 

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Although there’s no denying that the home Brazil team has a serious shot at this: 

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But please pray for our U.S. team. They’re going to need it!

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Our office is located in San Francisco, and we can attest that it doesn’t rain here all that often. Well, at least it hasn’t this year. We’re still flirting with drought conditions, but someone was apparently busy after a recent rainstorm capturing some lovely landscapes as they’re seen reflected in puddles. It’s one of the most photogenic cities in America reflected in entirely unique way. 
Via the Bold Italic. Collage made with Pixlr Express. 
Our office is located in San Francisco, and we can attest that it doesn’t rain here all that often. Well, at least it hasn’t this year. We’re still flirting with drought conditions, but someone was apparently busy after a recent rainstorm capturing some lovely landscapes as they’re seen reflected in puddles. It’s one of the most photogenic cities in America reflected in entirely unique way. 
Via the Bold Italic. Collage made with Pixlr Express. 

Our office is located in San Francisco, and we can attest that it doesn’t rain here all that often. Well, at least it hasn’t this year. We’re still flirting with drought conditions, but someone was apparently busy after a recent rainstorm capturing some lovely landscapes as they’re seen reflected in puddles. It’s one of the most photogenic cities in America reflected in entirely unique way. 

Via the Bold Italic. Collage made with Pixlr Express. 

Open Your Own Photo Shop on Creative Market

Do you sell your photos online? Have you ever thought about it? If so, we’ve got a sweet proposition for you: Hang out a shingle on Creative Market.

If you’re not familiar with Creative Market, it’s a site where independent creators from around the world sell their own “mousemade” content. Over time, they’ve expanded their marketplace to offer many different types of content made by independent artists: everything from illustrations to fonts to templates and web themes. This week, they’re taking their next big step: photos.

If you’ve ever designed anything digitally — a postcard, a flyer, a Wordpress site — you’ve surely wasted at least a few hours stumbling through stock photo sites like Getty Images and iStockphoto. And you’ve no doubt been frustrated that the images you find are sometimes less than creative. Sites like Women Laughing Alone with Salad have became a running joke in the online design community (and beyond) because they spotlight the absurdity of big stock photo marketplaces that long ago turned away from offering beautiful images and toward providing staged scenes to fit well-worn cliches. The goal of every graphic designer is to create something authentic and real, but all that canned stock imagery can really work against you.

Creative Market’s solution to this dilemma is to help independent photographers to bring some authenticity and art back into the stock photo world. If you’ve got some skill as a photographer (whether that’s using a $5,000 dSLR or an iPhone), you can open up your own store and sell your work on your own terms. The benefit for photo purchasers is easy to see. Customers get to choose from thousands of photos from authentic sources that have nothing “stock” about them, but the benefits for sellers are quite distinct from other photo marketplaces. Creative Market sellers keep 70% of every sale. (!) They set their own prices. They don’t have to exclusively sell their photos on Creative Market. And, there’s no cost in opening up a store.

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From a Pixlr perspective, we think this is nothing short of an amazing concept. Photographers getting an unprecedented amount of control over their work and how it’s sold? To us, that sounds like how it should have been done all along. All of which is to say we’re thrilled to have Creative Market under the same Autodesk umbrella and want to encourage any photographers who use our apps to check into this stellar opportunity.

Go see for yourself. If you like it, open up a store!

Everybody needs a specialty, and Alix Martinez is really good at photographing kids — especially underwater. She carefully constructs underwater scenes of kids playing sports, reading books, or just being themselves that have to be very difficult to capture. The end result sure looks worth it. Check out a gallery of her work on her site.  
Via My Modern Met. Collage made with Pixlr Express. 
Everybody needs a specialty, and Alix Martinez is really good at photographing kids — especially underwater. She carefully constructs underwater scenes of kids playing sports, reading books, or just being themselves that have to be very difficult to capture. The end result sure looks worth it. Check out a gallery of her work on her site.  
Via My Modern Met. Collage made with Pixlr Express. 

Everybody needs a specialty, and Alix Martinez is really good at photographing kids — especially underwater. She carefully constructs underwater scenes of kids playing sports, reading books, or just being themselves that have to be very difficult to capture. The end result sure looks worth it. Check out a gallery of her work on her site.  

Via My Modern Met. Collage made with Pixlr Express